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The Daily Armonk Newspaper: Armonk Charity Gives Backpacks to Yonkers Students

Armonk Charity Gives Backpacks to Yonkers Students

Dr. Kathy Fallon (left) stands alongside students of PS. 23 who had just been given new backpacks.

ARMONK, N.Y. – Dr. Kathy Reilly Fallon, of Armonk, is a physician in Manhattan and she loves her job, but her real passion is her charitable organization called Heavenly Productions Foundation, which donated over 600 backpacks to Public School #23 in Yonkers Friday, September, 9.

“I grew up in Yonkers originally,” Fallon said. “I just felt like I was done writing checks to these organizations and not knowing where the funds were going. It was great to physically collect the backpacks and go to the school so we knew that these kids were reaping the benefits of what we were doing.”

Fallon, along with sixth youth helpers – including her son James, collected backpacks and donations from friends, family members and businesses so that they could provide each student from pre-kindergarten to eighth grade with a new backpack.

“I was really eager to help out,” James Fallon said. “It was really nice and the experience was great.”

Youths Tyler Cermele, Michael Cermele and John Nolletti, of Pleasantville, and Kevin Enright, of Harrison, along with James Fallon, were awarded by Dr. Fallon and Yonkers Superintendent of Schools Bernard Pierorazio for their generous actions.

Pleasantville resident Sheryl Nolletti, Armonk’s Dr. Laura Cannistracci Carthy,  and Harrison’s Patrick Enright, also helped Dr. Fallon in organizing, packing all of the donations, and delivering everything to Yonkers Public School #23.

Along with the backpacks, Heavenly Productions donated books, school supplies, and hand sanitizer/wipes.

Dr. Fallon said she’d never seen kids so happy to receive school supplies before in her life than the students at Yonkers PS. 23.

“The principal stressed to me that most of those kids were not prepared to come to school for the first week,” Dr. Fallon said. “They had no pencils and no school supplies and a lot didn’t have backpacks, and the one’s that had them, they were old and worn out.”